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FAQs About the Student Conduct Process

See Reporting Student Conduct Violations to find frequently asked questions on that topic.

If your question is not addressed here, email us to ask your question directly.

Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education (SAGE)

Did the Office of Student Conduct change their name?

Yes! The Office of Student Conduct is now the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education or SAGE. We changed our name so that it better reflects the work we do as part of UC San Diego's campus community.

Miscellaneous

I was just documented for violating the Student Conduct Procedures. What should I do?

Check your UC San Diego student email account on a regular basis. You may be receiving an emailed letter to schedule a meeting about the documentation.

You can also check directly with the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education to see if a report has been submitted, and inquire about where it is at in the process.

Is sage@ucsd.edu a valid email address?

Yes. All letters sent to you regarding your case are from this address, which is a valid UC San Diego email address. Make sure to add this address to your list of safe senders in order to avoid messages getting lost in your spam folder. Please be advised our previous email was studentconduct@ucsd.edu.

You must also enter your PID when you click on the link in your letter so that we can verify your identity.

What if I don't regularly check my UC San Diego email account?

You receive official university correspondence at your UC San Diego email address and it is your responsibility to regularly maintain your account. If you're concerned you are not receiving correspondence, please update your safe sender list, check your spam folder, and consider contacting Educational Technology Services for further guidance.

Besides the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education, who else can I discuss the Student Conduct Process with?

You also have the following resources available to you:

Notice of Informal Warning

I received a Notice of Informal Warning. What is it?

The Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education reviews all incoming reports of alleged, non-academic misconduct. Sometimes a report may not rise to the level of a formal student conduct referral, and instead a Notice of Informal Warning is issued. The Notice of Informal Warning is our opportunity to educate you on potential Student Conduct Procedures violations that we think you should be aware of moving forward, based on the report we received.

You do not need to set up a meeting, and you have not been found responsible of anything. If repeated however, violations of a similar nature may be referred through the formal student conduct process. A copy of the report is attached to the Notice for your review.

If I receive a Notice of Informal Warning, what should I do next?

Nothing is required of you but you have a right to submit a statement in response to the Notice. You must submit your response within five business days of the date of your letter. The statement will be kept on file with the Notice and the report.

Interim Suspension Hearing

What is an Interim Suspension?

An Interim Suspension is the temporary suspension of a Respondent’s privileges on an interim basis before a final determination. During an interim period, a Respondent will normally be prohibited from attending any classes, entering University facilities, and participating in any University-Supported Activities, except for attending hearing(s). 

What can I expect in an Interim Suspension Hearing?

The purpose of an Interim Suspension Hearing is to determine whether the Respondent's participation in University-Supported Activities, use of University resources, or presence on University Property is reasonably likely to lead to: 

  • Physical harm to any person or property; 
  • Threats of violence; 
  • Conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person; or  
  • Other disruptive activity incompatible with the orderly operation of the campus. This includes conduct creating an immediate and/or continuing disruption to the health and safety of members of the University community, teaching, research, administration, disciplinary procedures, or other University-Supported Activities, or access and/or use of University Property. (see UC San Diego Policy on Speech, Advocacy and Distribution of Literature on University Grounds (Policy and Procedure Manual, Section 510-1 IX) for guidelines related to expressive activity on University Grounds and Facilities).  
The Interim Suspension Hearing is not to determine whether violations of the University of Conduct have occurred. You will have the opportunity to share your perspective, answer follow-up questions, propose witnesses, and ask questions of the Interim Suspension Hearing Officer. 

What are the possible outcomes of an Interim Suspension Hearing?

The Interim Suspension Hearing Officer will consider the information received in the report, supporting documents (if any), and the statements of the Respondent or any witnesses. The Interim Suspension Hearing Officer will review the information in the context of whether your presence at UC San Diego will lead to physical harm to any person or property, threats of violence, conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person, or other disruptive activity incompatible with the orderly operation of the campus and determine whether to uphold, modify, or overturn the Interim Suspension for the remainder of the Respondent’s student conduct process. The Hearing Officer will issue an Interim Suspension Decision outlining the information they considered, their decision, and rationale. 

Will an Interim Suspension affect my on-campus employment?

An Interim Suspension may affect your on-campus employment depending on the outcome of your Interim Suspension Hearing and the discretion of your employer. To discuss specific concerns, please contact your Interim Suspension Hearing Officer. 

Will an Interim Suspension affect my on-campus housing?

Students who are interim suspended and live on campus may face housing actions depending on the Interim Suspension Decision, the terms of their Housing Contract, and the unique facts of their incident. Students will typically be permitted to remain in their housing until an Interim Suspension Decision is reached unless notified otherwise. Students are encouraged to speak with their Interim Suspension Hearing Officer about their concerns, so they can be provided individualized advising and resources as needed. 

Students engaged in the current student conduct interim suspension process related to the May 1st Illegal Encampment will continue to have access to their on-campus housing until the student conduct process is completed.

Will an Interim Suspension affect my participation in commencement or conferral of my degree?

It depends - If a student is facing suspension or dismissal as a sanction, the EVC may direct SAGE to withhold a student’s degree and transcripts pending the conclusion of their student conduct case. Not everyone placed on Interim Suspension will necessarily be placed on Suspension or Dismissed. Possible sanctions are outlined in our sanctioning guidelines but may include a Delay of Degree or Exclusion from Campus Property or Activities, such as commencement.

Sanctions are determined case-by-case, considering the student’s conduct history, any aggravating or mitigating factors present, and the case’s type and nature. Sanctioning guidelines by violation type are published on our website and may be reviewed here. 

Who may attend my Interim Suspension Hearing?

Interim Suspension Hearings are closed to the public. Other than the Respondent, their Advisor, and the Hearing Officer, no one else is typically permitted at the Hearing. The student may bring one Advisor to confer with them privately at the Hearing and provide guidance. The Advisor may not actively participate in the Hearing. A person may not serve as an Advisor in a matter where they are a Complainant, Respondent, or witness. 

Please note a support person is not permitted for Interim Suspension Hearings. A support person is only permitted during the adjudication period of a SVSH case.

The student may also propose witnesses for the Interim Suspension Hearing Officer to consider. The Hearing Officer may schedule a separate meeting with them to hear their perspective. Witnesses with direct knowledge or information regarding the incident in question will generally be permitted. Character witnesses will not generally be permitted. Witness statements will not generally be permitted unless notarized or signed in the presence of a SAGE professional staff member. 

While not normally an issue, any person at a Hearing that becomes disruptive or prevents the orderly operation of the Hearing may be warned or excused from the remainder of the Hearing proceedings by the Hearing Officer.

Does SAGE record Interim Suspension Hearings?

The Interim Suspension Hearing Officer may take brief notes and will issue an Interim Suspension Decision summarizing their conversation and decision. The student is also welcome to take personal notes. However, Interim Suspension Hearings are not recorded, nor is recording of any kind permitted by anyone else at the Hearing.

After an Interim Suspension Hearing Decision, what’s next?

You will receive an Administrative Resolution Meeting letter with information about how to schedule an Administrative Resolution Meeting with a Student Conduct Officer to discuss an administrative resolution to the alleged violations.

Administrative Resolution Meeting

I received a letter to schedule an Administrative Resolution meeting. What should I do next?

Your letter provides a name and number to call to set up a meeting. Please call this person within five business days of the date of the letter.

What is an Administrative Resolution Meeting?

An Administrative Resolution Meeting is an informal meeting between you and a Student Conduct Officer to discuss one or more alleged violations of the Student Conduct Procedures, or other university policies and procedures.

What happens at an Administrative Resolution meeting?

The Student Conduct Officer (likely your Dean of Student Affairs, Director of Residence Life, Director of Student Affairs, Policy, Standards, and Conduct, or one of their designees) will explain the Administrative Resolution process, your rights and responsibilities, and the alleged violations. You will explain your perspective of the incident and answer questions from the Student Conduct Officer. At the conclusion of the meeting, you will have the opportunity to accept responsibility for the alleged violations and the Student Conduct Officer will explain the potential sanctions (if any).

Will I be able to review the incident report(s) and other evidence?

Normally you will receive a copy of the incident report and other evidence with your letter.

If you do not receive this information with your letter, please contact the person who sent you the letter or the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education at (858) 534-6225 or sage@ucsd.edu.

Can I have an advisor at the meeting with me?

Yes, you may have an advisor accompany you to an Administrative Resolution meeting. Advisors include Associated Students (A.S.)or Graduate and Professional Student Association (GPSA) appointed Student Advocates, attorneys, and other UC San Diego students, faculty, or staff. However, only A.S. Student Advocates may take direct part in the meeting. For more information, please see the Roles and Responsibilities section of the Student Conduct Procedures (Letter F, Section V).

What if I don't want to accept responsibility for one or more alleged violations?

If you feel that you are not responsible for one or more alleged violations and the allegations are not dismissed by the Student Conduct Officer, you or the Student Conduct Officer may request a Student Conduct Review. You can make this request directly to your Student Conduct Officer at the conclusion of the meeting.

When will I receive the decision of the Student Conduct Officer?

You should receive a resolution letter via email from your Student Conduct Officer within 10 business days of your meeting, unless circumstances warrant otherwise.

If you accepted responsibility, the resolution letter will contain a brief summary of the meeting, the alleged violations for which you accepted responsibility, the assigned sanctions, and how to submit a Sanction Reduction Request.

If you did not accept responsibility and the Student Conduct Officer dismissed the alleged violations, you will receive a resolution letter containing a brief summary of the meeting and an explanation that the alleged violations have been dismissed.

If you did not accept responsibility, and you or the Student Conduct Officer requested a Student Conduct Review, your Student Conduct Officer will send you a Student Conduct Review Confirmation advising you of the next steps in the process.

What if I don't schedule an appointment, or I miss my meeting?

If you fail to schedule or attend your Administrative Resolution meeting, your Student Conduct Officer will issue a second notice via email, reminding you of your opportunity to meet.

Failure to schedule or attend your Administrative Resolution meeting after receiving a second notice will result in the incident being adjudicated by the Student Conduct Officer, without the benefit of your input, using the information available to them. They will also assign sanctions as applicable. We encourage you to set up an appointment in a timely manner when requested to do so.

Student Conduct Review

What is a Student Conduct Review?

A Student Conduct Review (Letter G) is a formal hearing with one or more Respondents and the Community Standards Board or Review Officer, to resolve any alleged violations of the Student Conduct Procedures not resolved at an Administrative Resolution meeting.

If I request a Student Conduct Review, will I be assigned more serious sanctions if I'm found responsible?

You won't be assigned worse sanctions for simply requesting a Student Conduct Review. However, if new information comes to light at the Review that would be considered an aggravating factor, your Student Conduct Officer may consider this information when determining sanctions. For a list of mitigating/aggravating factors, please visit our Sanctioning Guidelines (PDF).

What happens at a Student Conduct Review?

The Community Standards Board Chair or Review Officer begins by explaining the process, your rights, and the alleged violations. The University Representative will then present information and witnesses supporting the alleged violations.

You will then have the opportunity to present information and witnesses supporting your case.You and the University Representative will have the opportunity to ask follow-up questions of the witnesses and of each other. The Board or Review Officer will also have the opportunity to ask follow-up questions of you, the witnesses and the University Representative.

You and the University Representative will be given the opportunity to make any summary statements. Then the Chair or Review Officer will conclude the Review by explaining the next steps in the process, before deliberating privately.

For additional information please see our Student Conduct Review at a Glance (Word doc).

When will I receive the decision of the Board or Review Officer?

After the Review, the Board or Review Officer will determine whether you are responsible for any of the alleged violations. The Board or Review Officer will submit a report of their findings to the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education (SAGE) within five business days of the date of the Review.

Your original Student Conduct Officer will then review the report and determine final sanctions (if any) within five business days of receiving the report, unless circumstances warrant otherwise. For Reviews involving a suspension or dismissal for an undergraduate student, the Council of Deans of Student Affairs will determine the sanctions within five business days of receiving the report, unless circumstances warrant otherwise.

You will be notified of the findings and sanctions via your UC San Diego email by SAGE within 10 to 15 business days from the date of the Review, unless circumstances warrant otherwise. A copy of the report will be attached to the decision letter, and your letter will include information about how to appeal the findings and/or submit a sanctions reduction request.

If the Board or Review Officer finds you not responsible, you will be notified by SAGE within five business days of receiving the report, advising you that the case is closed with no further consequence to you. A copy of the report will be attached to the decision letter.

Sanctions

What are possible sanctions?

Sanctions are outcomes assigned by your Student Conduct Officer. Sanctioning is progressive and takes into consideration the violation(s), your cumulative Student Conduct Record and any mitigating/aggravating factors. Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: formal warning, educational programs, restitution, probation, suspension, and/or dismissal from the University.

Please take a look at our sanctioning guidelines document (PDF), which describes potential sanctions for a variety of violation types. Sanctions are designed to be consistent across colleges and residential areas. However, cases are evaluated on an individual basis and not subject to precedent as in the civil and criminal court systems.

What is Probation?

Probation is an Administrative Sanction that may be assigned as part of a student conduct resolution. It is considered more serious than a Formal Warning, but less serious than a Suspension. While it will not appear on your transcript, it is part of your Student Conduct Record and may be reported on Student Conduct Record checks.

Additionally, if you are documented for a new incident while on Probation, you have violated your probationary status and may be assigned more significant sanctions for the new incident.

How long can I be on probation or suspended from the university?

Depending on the incident and your cumulative student conduct record, you may be placed on probation anywhere from one quarter to the remainder of your tenure at UC San Diego. Suspensions range from one quarter to an indefinite period of time.

If I don't complete my sanctions, what will happen to me?

A hold will be placed on your student account, which prevents you from registering for classes, ordering transcripts, or conducting other business with the university.

Appeals and Sanction Reduction Requests

Can I appeal the decision at my Administrative Resolution Meeting?

If you accept responsibility for one or more student conduct violation(s) at an Administrative Resolution Meeting, there is no decision to appeal. Your decision to accept responsibility is considered final. Failure to make or attend a meeting is considered an admission of responsibility and the Student Conduct Officer will adjudicate the alleged violations without the benefit of your input, using the information available to them.

Can I appeal the sanctions following an Administrative Resolution Meeting?

Yes, if you accepted responsibility at an Administrative Resolution meeting or failed to appear, you can request that the assigned sanctions be reduced by submitting a Sanctions Reduction Request to the Office of Student Conduct.

You must submit a Sanctions Reduction Request within 10 business days of the date of your resolution letter. Information on how to submit this request and what to include can be found on our Appeal/ Sanction Reduction Request page.

Can I appeal the decision and/or sanctions from a Student Conduct Review?

Yes, you can submit an appeal of the findings and/or sanction reduction request to the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education within ten business days of the date of your Student Conduct Review Decision Letter.

Information on how to submit this request and what to include can be found on our Appeal/ Sanction Reduction Request page.

If I submit an appeal and/or sanction reduction request, do I have to complete the assigned sanctions?

Sanctions may be deferred during the appeals process at the discretion of your original Student Conduct Officer, in consultation with the Director of Student Affairs, Policy, Standards, and Conduct. If you have questions about this, please contact your original Student Conduct Officer and/or the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education for more information.

Will I appear before the individual or group reviewing the appeal and/or sanction reduction request?

No, you will not appear before the individual or group reviewing the appeal and/or sanction reduction request.

If I submit an appeal and/or sanction reduction request, how will I receive the decision?

You will be notified of the decision via your UC San Diego email by the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education within ten business days of the date that a complete appeal and/or sanction reduction request was submitted, unless circumstances warrant otherwise. A brief statement explaining the basis of the decision will be included with the notification.

Student Conduct Records

What is in my student conduct record?

Your student conduct record generally contains the applicable incident report(s), meeting and decision letters, and other documents related to student conduct incidents you have been involved in while a UC San Diego student.

Are student conduct records confidential?

Yes! Only certain University staff including the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education, your college Dean's Office, the Residential Life Offices, or those with a legitimate right to know, as defined by the Family Educational Rights to Privacy Act, have access to your student conduct records. You may choose to sign an authorization to allow us to release your student conduct records to another person or organization such as a parent or guardian, Study Abroad program, or Advisor.

How long are student conduct records kept and maintained?

In alignment with University policy and federal law, we keep and maintain student conduct records for seven years from the academic year in which the incident resolved in. Records involving dismissals from the University are kept and maintained for 50 years from the academic year in which the incident resolved in.

Can I expunge any of my cases?

No, there is no process for expunging your cases.

I have a student conduct record. How will this affect my graduate school application?

Typically graduate schools will inquire about your student conduct record during the application process via a "Disciplinary Clearance Form." Questions on these forms vary and your Dean of Student Affairs will answer the questions in a way least detrimental to your application. Alternatively, they may ask you to have your Dean of Student Affairs complete a Dean's Certification Letter.

Please consult with the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education to determine if you have a student conduct record and if so, what will be reported to a prospective graduate program or professional school. To request a Dean's Certification letter, please contact your Dean of Student Affairs office directly for more information.

I have a student conduct record. How will this affect my job prospects after graduation?

Most future employers will not inquire about your student conduct record. However, relevant organizations will require you to release your records for review by an affiliated investigator (e.g. if you are sitting for the bar exam, or the job you're applying to involves security clearance). The investigator will provide us with a copy of your signed release form and request a copy of your student conduct records. We will not release your confidential records without a Consent to Disclose form from you.

Please consult with the Center for Student Accountability, Growth, and Education to determine if you have a student conduct record and if so, what will be reported.

How can I request my own Student Conduct Record?

Students are able to submit a request to access their own Student Conduct Record. In order to verify your identity and ensure we do not release your records to anyone else, we ask that you submit a copy of valid student ID or current photo ID. You can submit your request by completing our online Student Conduct Records Request form.

Can someone else request my Student Conduct Records? Can I grant them access?

Yes. But only with a completed Consent to Disclose form. A student must grant a third party access to their records. If you would like to give a third party access for reasons such as background/ security check, employment opportunity or admissions process, please complete the online Student Conduct Records Request form.

See Reporting Student Conduct Violations to find frequently asked questions on that topic.

If your question is not addressed here, email us to ask your question directly.